Plum Creek Watershed Feral Hog Project

As in many areas across the Texas landscape and elsewhere in the nation, feral hog numbers appear to be increasing in the Plum Creek Watershed. These animals damage crops, livestock, pets, landscaping, and natural habitat in rural and urban areas alike.

Feral hogs also have the potential to contribute to water pollution. Due to their numbers, distribution, and behavior, feral hogs can increase the levels of sediment, nutrients, and bacteria in streams and lakes. Habitat analysis and landowner observations indicate this is the case in the Plum Creek Watershed. In some situations, water quality may become so degraded that it cannot support recreation or aquatic life.

The Texas AgriLife Extension Service is cooperating with the Plum Creek Watershed Partnership to address this growing local issue. Working to provide information and assistance to watershed landowners, we may reduce the effects of feral hog activity.

1,333 feral hogs were removed and 510 citizens educated in the fall 2014 Bounty and Education Program for Caldwell County which wrapped up Sunday, November 30!!!  

For more information, email the Task Force at ccfhtf@gmail.com

Caldwell County Feral Hog Task Force News

CCFHTF Logo

  • The fall 2014 Caldwell County Feral Hog Bounty program wrapped up Sunday, November 30 with 1,333 wild pigs removed from the Plum Creek watershed and surrounding areas.  Over 500 landowners, hunters, trappers and other local citizens attended at least one educational workshop. 
  • 2015 Kickoff Meeting coming in January... Check back soon for details.
  • The First Annual Caldwell Co. Feral Hog Task Force Veterans' Day Salute was a great success!  Big THANK YOU to the veterans, speakers, Lockhart High School Band and over a dozen Task Force volunteers for helping spread the word about the damage feral hogs inflict on the Plum Creek watershed. 

Vet Day Salute 

  • Caldwell / Hays Wild Pig Jackpot Competition a success!!!  Over 300 feral hogs harvested and $1,000 in cash prizes award to the top teams and individuals.  A BIG THANK YOU to Helicopter Tours of Texas for donating an aerial operations training course to our top individual, Val Ramirez!!!

     2014 Jackpot Pic 1             2014 Jackpot Pic 2

Final CHAMP program report for implementation of the 2013-14 Feral Hog Action Plan for Hays and Caldwell County coming soon...  

 

Caldwell County June 2014 Graph

CHAMP Award Letter

2013 through 2014 Task Force Program Forms for Caldwell/Hays County
Click the links below to download program forms.  Drop off completed forms at any bounty claim station, scan and email to ccfhtf@gmail.com or submit by mail to CCFHTF, P.O. Box 223, Lockhart, TX 78644
Additional programs available to Caldwell / Hays County landowners through the Task Force.  Sign up via email or in person at one of four bounty claim stations.  Email requests to ccfhtf@gmail.com.
Special Programs
Suggested Donation (not required)
Aerial Control
$25 registration PLUS 10₵ per acre
Professional Trapping and Hunting Services
$2 per harvested feral hog
30’ and 17’ corral traps with wireless technology
$50 per month of use
40’ Drop Net with wireless technology
$50 per month of use
Volunteer hunters/trappers
Task force will work with landowners to match needs with volunteers
 
Task Force Leadership Committee:
 
Contact the Task Force at ccfhtf@gmail.com
 2013-2014 Caldwell County Feral Hog Task Force Leadership Committee 
Mark Carrillo Landowner mcarrillo@apple.com
Stuart Carter Landowner cccc39@yahoo.com
Nick Dornak Plum Creek Watershed Partnership ndornak@plumcreekwatershed.org
Meredith Longoria Texas Parks and Wildlife meredith.longoria@tpwd.texas.gov
Jesse Staton Landowner doe555@msn.com
Dawn Tschirhart Landowner / Treasurer dawntsch@gmail.com
Tom Bonn Caldwell County Representative tom.bonn@co.caldwell.tx.us
Shane Scott Hays County Representative sscott@sanmarcostx.gov
 
In the media:

Plum Creek Watershed Feral Hog Project

As in many areas across the Texas landscape and elsewhere in the nation, feral hog numbers appear to be increasing in the Plum Creek Watershed. These animals damage crops, livestock, pets, landscaping, and natural habitat in rural and urban areas alike.

Feral hogs also have the potential to contribute to water pollution. Due to their numbers, distribution, and behavior, feral hogs can increase the levels of sediment, nutrients, and bacteria in streams and lakes. Habitat analysis and landowner observations indicate this is the case in the Plum Creek Watershed. In some situations, water quality may become so degraded that it cannot support recreation or aquatic life.

The Texas AgriLife Extension Service is cooperating with the Plum Creek Watershed Partnership to address this growing local issue. Working to provide information and assistance to watershed landowners, we may reduce the effects of feral hog activity.

Create a Report to help track Feral Hogs
Download presentations with voice-overs to learn more about regulations and disease concerns
eXtension Feral Hogs Community of Practice Webinars